For many millennia, the Great Plains of North America was inhabited by nomadic Native Americans. From the 16th century to 18th century, the Kingdom of France claimed ownership of large parts of North America. In 1762, after the French and Indian War, France secretly ceded New France to Spain, per the Treaty of Fontainebleau. In 1802, Spain returned most of the land to France, but keeping title to about 7,500 square miles.

In 1803, most of the land for modern day Kansas was acquired by the United States from France as part of the 828,000 square mile Louisiana Purchase for 2.83 cents per acre. In 1848, after the Mexican–American War, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo with Spain brought into the United States all or part of land for ten future states, including southwest Kansas. In 1854, the Kansas Territory was organized, then in 1861 Kansas became the 34th U.S. state.

Moving to Chase County | Chase County Kansas — Find Yourself Here
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Escape to a secluded cottage in Chase County and wake up to songbirds and breathtaking sunrises over gently rolling hills. Look out over the waves of grasslands and see no trace of man. Let the Cottonwood River or a whispering breeze lull you to sleep at night. See the stars as they are meant to be seen, unfiltered by artificial light.

Dine at restaurants known across the state and nationally. Get inspired by nature, or commune with local artists and musicians nulled.

Most importantly, forget the idea that Kansas is flat. The Flint Hills have captivated travelers since the days of horses and wagons. A prehistoric ocean once covered the area, and the rolling waves of lush grass still resemble a rippling sea. Chase County has the largest undisturbed swath of the Flint Hills, including the federally protected Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve.

The Flint Hills are a sacred place. When exploring the countryside, please take care to keep the area beautiful. Remember:

  • Please don’t litter
  • Stay on the roads – don’t venture onto private land without permission
  • Keep a safe distance from wildlife
  • Leave the Hills as beautiful as you found them: don’t destroy or remove plants, rocks, architecture, or other objects
  • Have a map with you
  • Some roads are low-maintenance and may be rough
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